Forum Lyme Francophone

Media-tiques, portail francophone d'informations sur les maladies vectorielles à tiques • France Lyme
Nous sommes le 12 Déc 2019 16:48

Les heures sont au format UTC + 2 heures [ Heure d’été ]




Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 11 messages ] 
Auteur Message
 Sujet du message: manifestations neurologiques
MessagePublié: 30 Mars 2006 12:01 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 23 Juil 2005 14:14
Messages: 669
Localisation: seine et marne
Nervous System Manifestations of Lyme Disease in Children
(traduction voir plus bas)
By Michael K. Sowell, MD (Pediatric Neurologist) November, 1999
Lyme disease is the most common vector-borne (transmitted by non-humans) disease in the United States and Europe. It is a multi-system disease which may affect the skin, eyes, heart, musculoskeletal system and nervous system.

Lyme disease in children merits special consideration because of its potentially devastating effects on the developing brain. Furthermore, some of the neurologic symptoms of Lyme disease may be more difficult to elucidate in children because of their inability to convey their symptoms, due to their developmental limitations.

It is said that Lyme disease is the “New Great Imitator", which emphasizes that Lyme disease can affect virtually any area of the nervous system as well as imitate other diseases. This is particularly true in view of the difficulties of establishing a firm diagnosis (reviewed elsewhere). This brief article is intended to be an overview of the potential neurologic manifestations of Lyme disease in children.

One of the most difficult challenges of writing this article is to translate medical terminology into plain English that is understandable to the average non-medically trained person. I am accepting that challenge, but please understand there may be concepts that are either difficult to understand or are grossly oversimplified.

Knowledge of the anatomy of the nervous system and localization of the disease process through a combination of history, physical examination and testing (such as MRI, blood tests, etc.) is of the utmost importance in making the correct neurologic diagnosis.

The nervous system is classically divided into five different areas:
brain
spinal cord
peripheral nerve
nerve-muscle junction
muscle

Again, simplistically speaking, the brain is divided into two hemispheres (right and left), the cerebellum and the brain stem. The cerebral hemispheres are responsible for our so-called higher cortical functions, such as speech, mentation, vision, language processing and the initiation of movement and interpretation of sensations. The extrapyramidal system is deep between the two hemispheres and controls precision of movements. Disorders of the extrapyramidal system cause tics, muscle jerks and some twitches and tremors. The cerebellum is largely responsible for the coordination of movements. The brainstem controls basic, primitive functions (such as smell, eye movements, vision, facial sensation and movement, hearing, balance, tongue movements and swallowing).

The spinal cord is encased within the bony spinal column and carries nerve signals involving sensation and motor functions between the brain and the remainder of the nervous system. The brain and spinal cord together are collectively called the central nervous system.

The peripheral nerve is where both sensory and motor signals are carried to and from the spinal cord. A nerve root (radicle) is where the peripheral nerve joins the spinal cord. We thus hear terms like radiculopathy, polyradiculopathy, and polyradiculoneuropathy. These terms loosely refer to irritation of one or, more commonly, multiple nerve roots. The nerve-muscle junction (neuromuscular junction) is where the peripheral nerve communicates with the muscle.

When people refer to skeletal muscle, they are usually referring to skeletal muscle which is involved in our bodies' movement. However, keep in mind that Lyme disease may also involve the heart muscle and smooth muscle (muscle of the gastrointestinal tract).

The peripheral nerve, nerve-muscle junction, and muscle are collectively referred to as the peripheral nervous system.

With this brief overview, we will now look at some ways that Lyme disease may involve the nervous system. Each condition will be categorized according to the area of the nervous system predominantly affected (which, in itself, is a gross oversimplification, since usually more than one area is affected at a time.)

Brain:
Neuroborreliosis may affect the brain in a number of ways, including:

Aseptic meningitis:
Usually manifested by headache, neck stiffness, fever and disorientation or confusion. It is often mild and may not be sufficient to result in the patient seeking medical attention This may last for hours, days or months, but typically occurs in the initial stages.

Seizures:
Often characterized by abrupt transient loss of consciousness, twitching and jerking. Respiratory distress may occur in a percentage of patients. EEGs may be done to assist in the diagnosis, but findings are not specific to Lyme disease.

Encephalopathy:
Characterized by more chronic cognitive changes, which may involve impaired speech (both receptive and expressive), disorientation, impaired memory, irritability and decreased level of awareness to one's environment. There may be a number of other neuropsychiatric changes, detailed well by Drs. Fallon, et al. Patients with chronic Lyme disease may initially be misdiagnosed with a primary psychiatric disorder. Children with neuroborreliosis may present with developmental delay or, later, with school failure or symptoms of attention deficit disorder, thus being mislabeled as having attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Whereas ADHD as a primary diagnosis is much more common, neuroborreliosis needs to be included as a possibility, particularly in the child who is exhibiting other possible symptoms of Lyme disease.

Increased intracranial pressure:
Reported in several children with Lyme disease, this would typically present with headaches, double vision and, occasionally, vomiting. In my view, this has been erroneously reported as a "pseudotumor cerebri-like" syndrome. True pseudotumor cerebri is defined by elevated intracranial pressure after the exclusion of all potential causes, including chronic infection. Thus, I think that this title is not accurate and may be misleading.

Extrapyramidal system:
This may be involved in Lyme disease, with symptoms ranging from muscle jerks, rigidity, tremors, exaggerated sleep jerks (myoclonus), tics and cramps.

Cerebellum:
Possibly involved in Lyme disease as manifested by ataxia, a medical term meaning poorly coordinated gait, often accompanied by frequent falling. Ataxia is a symptom, not a diagnosis, and can occur from impairment in different areas of the nervous system

Brainstem:
It can be affected by Lyme disease due to cranial nerve palsies. Cranial nerve involvement has been reported in virtually all of the cranial nerves. Vertigo and dizziness/dysequilibrium from both CNS and PNS dysfunction have been reported with Lyme disease.

Spinal cord:
Transverse myelitis:
An acute disorder of the spinal cord involving area(s) of inflammation or infection that causes motor or sensory malfunction, possibly leading to permanent impairments. As such, it may be due to a variety of possible causes, including multiple sclerosis, viruses or Lyme disease, all of which merit careful investigation.

Peripheral Nerve:
Peripheral neuropathies:
These have been reported, although they are said to be less common in children. They may be sensory (involving abnormal or diminished sensation), which may involve pain, tightness, numbness and tingling or other unusual sensations. Motor neuropathies typically involve weakness and reduced muscle strength and/or bulk in the affected area. Often peripheral neuropathies are mixed motor and sensory.

Radiculoneuropathies:
Involve irritation at the level of the nerve root, where the peripheral nerve joins the spinal cord. Typically, there is pain or discomfort near the spine. Both radiculoneuropathies and peripheral neuropathies may be further defined by eloctromyography and nerve conduction studies (EMG/NCVs), the findings of which are not specific to, or diagnostic of, Lyme disease.

Neuromuscular Junction:
Myasthenia Gravis-like syndrome:
Rarely reported in children, it involves a decrement in muscle power with sustained muscle contraction. This must be confirmed by EMG/NCV.

Muscle:
Myositis:
This is common among patients with both early and late chronic Lyme disease. Muscle symptoms include muscle tenderness, stiffness, cramping and muscle swelling.


In summary, Lyme disease may affect virtually any area of the nervous system and lead to a variety of manifestations, either in isolation or in combination. In addition, as more appropriately reviewed elsewhere, Lyme disease is foremost a clinical diagnosis, with marked difficulties in establishing confirmatory laboratory tests. In addition, concomitant infections may exist, which often need to be addressed. Furthermore, there exists ongoing controversy regarding the duration and nature of therapy, although it can be stated unequivocally that therapy must be individualized.

Lyme disease in children may affect the nervous system in virtually every way that it can in adults, plus it has the added potential for detrimental effects on the developing brain in particular. Pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists face the added challenge of the developmental limitations involved in conveying symptoms from patient to physician.

It should always be borne in mind that Lyme disease is treatable and merits aggressive therapy in order to avoid potentially permanent devastating neurologic impairment.



Suggested Reading:

Belman AL, Coyle PK, Roque C, et al: MRI Findings in Children Infected by Borrelia burgdorferi. Pediatric Neurology 8:428-31.

Belman AL, Iyer M, Coyle PK, et al: Neurologic Manifestations in children with North America Lyme Disease. Neurology 43:2609-2614.

Demaerel P, Wilms G., Casteels K, et al: Childhood neuroborreliosis: clinicoradiological correlation. Paediatric Neuroradiology 37:578-581.

Fallon BA, Nields JA: Lyme Disease: A Neuropsychiatric Illness. Am J Psychiatry 151:1571-1583.

Lawrence C, Lipton RB, Lowry FD and Coyle PK: Seronegative Chronic Relapsing Neuroborreliosis. European Neurology 35: 113-117.

Lesser RL, Kornmehl EW, Pachner AR, et al: Neuro-Opthalmologic Manifestations of Lyme Disease. Ophthalmology 97:699-706.

Pachner AR and Steere AC: The triad of neurologic manifestations of Lyme disease: Meningitis, cranial neuritis, and radiculoneuritis. Neurology 35: 47-53.

Pachner AR: Borrellia burgdorferi in the Nervous System: The New "Great Imitator”. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 539: 56-64.

Reik L, Jr.: Lyme Disease. In Scheld WM, Whitley, Durack DT, eds: Infections of the Nervous System, New York, 1996, Raven Press.

Zaidman GW: The Ocular Manifestations of Lyme Disease. International Ophthalmology Clinics 33: 9-22

_________________
Nath, Paris
:idea: lexique des abréviations


Modifié en dernier par nath le 26 Mai 2006 11:19, modifié 1 fois.

Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message:
MessagePublié: 25 Mai 2006 23:25 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif

Enregistré le: 07 Fév 2006 13:55
Messages: 47
Localisation: Midi Pyrénées
Manifestations neurologiques de la maladie de Lyme chez les enfants

Par Michael K. Sowell, Docteur en Médecine (Pédiatre Neurologue), novembre 1999

La maladie de Lyme est la maladie vectorielle (non transmise par des humains) la plus commune aux Etats-Unis et en Europe. C'est une maladie qui touche plusieurs systèmes, pouvant affecter la peau, les yeux, le cœur, le système musculo-squelettique et le système nerveux.

La maladie de Lyme chez les enfants mérite une attention toute particulière en raison de ses effets potentiellement dévastateurs sur un cerveau qui n’a pas fini son développement. En outre, certains symptômes neurologiques de la maladie de Lyme peuvent être difficiles à détecter chez les enfants en raison de leur incapacité à exprimer leurs symptômes, en fonction de leur stade de développement.

La maladie de Lyme est considérée comme la «nouvelle grande imitatrice » et il faut souligner le fait que la maladie de Lyme peut affecter toute zone du système nerveux et imiter d’autres maladies. C’est un fait que l’on retrouve dans les difficultés à établir un diagnostic ferme (d’autres étiologies peuvent être possibles). Ce petit article a été écrit pour donner une vue d'ensemble des éventuelles manifestations neurologiques de la maladie de Lyme chez les enfants.

Un des défis les plus difficiles dans la rédaction de cet article est de traduire la terminologie médicale dans un langage précis mais compréhensible et à la portée d’une personne sans qualification médicale. J'accepte ce défi, mais je vous prie de prendre en compte le fait que certains concepts peuvent être difficiles à comprendre ou simplifiés à l’excès.

La connaissance de l'anatomie du système nerveux et de la localisation des manifestations de la maladie par l’étude de l’historique du malade, de l'examen physique et des tests (tels que l’IRM, les sérologies, etc.) est primordiale pour établir un diagnostic neurologique correct.

Le système nerveux est normalement divisé en cinq parties différentes : le cerveau, le cordon médullaire, le nerf périphérique, la jonction du muscle nerveux, le muscle.

Encore une fois, pour dire les choses simplement, le cerveau est divisé en deux hémisphères (droit et gauche), le cervelet et la tige cervicale. Les hémisphères cérébraux sont responsables des fonctions corticales les plus élevées, telles que le discours, la réflexion, la vision, les capacités linguistiques, la commande des mouvements et l'interprétation des sensations. Le système extrapyramidal est situé profondément entre les deux hémisphères et commande la précision des mouvements. Les désordres du système extrapyramidal sont à l’origine des tics, des mouvements musculaires involontaires ainsi que des mouvements convulsifs et des tremblements. Le cervelet est en grande partie responsable de la coordination des mouvements. Le tronc cérébral commande des fonctions de base primitives (telles que l'odeur, les mouvements oculaires, la vision, la sensation et le mouvement facial, l'audition, l'équilibre, les mouvements de la langue et la déglutition).

Le cordon médullaire est protégé par la colonne spinale osseuse et héberge les signaux nerveux impliquant les fonctions de sensation et de motricité entre le cerveau et le reste du système nerveux. Le cerveau et le cordon médullaire réunis portent le nom de système nerveux central.

Le nerf périphérique se trouve à l’arrivée des signaux sensoriels et moteurs et sur la corde spinale. On trouve une racine nerveuse (un radicule) à la jonction du nerf périphérique et du cordon médullaire. Nous employons ici les termes de radiculopathie, polyradiculopathie, et polyradiculoneuropathie. Ces termes se rapportent de manière générale à l'irritation d'un ou, plus souvent, plusieurs nerfs radiculaires. La jonction nerf-muscle (jonction neuromusculaire) se trouve à l’endroit où le nerf périphérique communique avec le muscle.

Lorsque l’on parle du muscle squelettique, on se réfère habituellement au muscle squelettique qui est impliqué dans le mouvement du corps. Cependant, il faut garder à l'esprit que la maladie de Lyme peut également impliquer le muscle cardiaque et le muscle lisse (muscle du système gastro-intestinal).

Le nerf périphérique, la jonction neuromusculaire, et le muscle sont regroupés sous la dénomination de système nerveux périphérique.

Grâce à cette brève vue d'ensemble, nous allons maintenant nous intéresser aux différentes manifestations de la maladie de Lyme sur le système nerveux. Chaque symptôme sera classé en fonction de la zone du système nerveux principalement affecté (ce qui, en fait, est une grossière simplification, puisqu'habituellement plus d'un secteur est affecté à la fois.)

Le cerveau :
La neuroborreliose peut affecter le cerveau de différentes manières, incluant :

La méningite aseptique :
Se manifestant habituellement par des céphalées, une rigidité du cou, une fièvre et une désorientation ou une confusion. Cette méningite est souvent de faible intensité et peut ne pas être assez prononcée pour que le patient cherche à avoir une explication médicale. Elle peut durer pendant des heures, des jours ou des mois, mais se produit généralement dans les phases initiales.

Les crises :
Souvent caractérisées par une perte passagère brusque de conscience, avec des contractures et des élancements. Une détresse respiratoire peut se produire chez un certain pourcentage des patients. Des EEG* peuvent être faits pour aider au diagnostic, mais les résultats ne sont pas spécifiques à la maladie de Lyme.

L’encéphalopathie :
Caractérisée par des changements cognitifs plus chroniques, qui peuvent aller jusqu’à l’altération de la parole (réceptif et expressif), la désorientation, la perte de mémoire, l’irritabilité et la diminution de la reconnaissance de l’environnement. Il peut y avoir un certain nombre d'autres changements neuropsychiatriques, que le Docteur Fallon et d’autres ont fort bien détaillés. Des patients présentant la maladie de Lyme chronique peuvent être mal diagnostiqués au départ ayant un désordre psychiatrique primaire. Les enfants atteints de neuroborreliose peuvent présenter des retards de développement ou, plus tard, des échecs scolaires ou des déficits d’attention, et de ce fait recevoir à tort le diagnostic d’ADHD* (désordre d'hyperactivité de déficit d'attention). Alors que l'ADHD est un diagnostic initial très commun, la neuroborreliose devrait être incluse comme diagnostic possible, en particulier chez l'enfant qui présente d'autres symptômes pouvant être liés à la maladie de Lyme.

La pression intracrânienne accrue :
Rapportée chez plusieurs enfants atteints de la maladie de Lyme, les manifestations typiques sont des maux de tête, une vision double et, de temps en temps, des vomissements. A mon avis, ces troubles sont incorrectement interprétés comme étant un syndrome de «pseudotumeurs cérébrales». L’authentique pseudotumeur cérébrale est définie par une pression intracrânienne élevée après que exclusion de toutes les autres causes possibles, y compris l'infection chronique. Ainsi, je pense que cette appellation n'est pas précise et peut être fallacieuse.

Le système Extrapyramidal :
Il pourrait être impliqué dans la maladie de Lyme, avec des symptômes allant des mouvements musculaires involontaires, à la rigidité, en passant par les tremblements, les secousses rythmiques survenant pendant le sommeil (myoclonie), les tics et les crampes.

Le cervelet :
Probablement impliqué dans la maladie de Lyme dans ses manifestations d’ataxie, un terme médical signifiant une mauvaise coordination de la marche, souvent accompagnée de chutes fréquentes. L'ataxie est un symptôme, pas un diagnostic, et peut se produire lors d’un affaiblissement de différentes régions du système nerveux.

Le tronc cérébral :
Il peut être affecté par la maladie de Lyme dans les manifestations de paralysies de nerf crânien. Le rôle du nerf crânien concerne presque tous les nerfs crâniens. Des vertiges et des étourdissements/déséquilibres dus au dysfonctionnement du CNS* et du PNS* ont été rapportés dans le cadre de la maladie de Lyme.

Cordon médullaire :
La myelite transversale :
Une affection aigue du cordon médullaire provoquant des zones d'inflammation ou d'infection à l’origine de dysfonctionnements moteur ou sensoriel, pouvant déclencher des affaiblissements permanents. Une grande variété de causes possibles peut être évoquée dont la sclérose en plaques, un virus ou une maladie de Lyme, causes qui requièrent une recherche consciencieuse.

Le nerf périphérique :
Les neuropathies périphériques :
Des cas ont été rapportés, bien qu'ils soient moins communs chez les enfants. Ils peuvent être sensoriels (impliquant une sensation anormale ou diminuée), et peuvent provoquer douleur, oppression, engourdissement ainsi que des sensations de fourmillement ou d’autres sensations moins communes. Les neuropathies motrices provoquent spécifiquement faiblesse et réduction de la force et/ou du volume musculaire dans la zone affectée. Les neuropathies périphériques sont souvent à la fois motrices et sensorielles.

Les radiculoneuropathies :
Elles engendrent l'irritation au niveau du nerf radiculaire, à l’endroit où le nerf périphérique joint le cordon médullaire. L’on ressent typiquement une douleur ou une sensation désagréable près de l’épine dorsale. Les radiculoneuropathies et les neuropathies périphériques peuvent toutes deux être détectées par des éloctromyographies et des tests sur la conduction nerveuse (EMG* / NCV*), les résultats desquels ne sont pas spécifiques à la maladie de Lyme.

La jonction neuromusculaire :
Le syndrome de myasthénie gravis :
Rarement rapporté chez les enfants, ce syndrome déclenche une diminution la puissance musculaire avec des contractures musculaires persistantes. Ce syndrome est confirmé par EMG et NCV.

Le muscle :
La myosite :
C'est une caractéristique commune chez les patients atteints de la maladie de Lyme chronique à toutes les phases. Les symptômes musculaires incluent la fragilité musculaire, la rigidité, les crampes et le gonflement musculaire.

En résumé, la maladie de Lyme peut affecter pratiquement n'importe quelle zone du système nerveux et mener à une variété de manifestations, isolés ou groupés. En outre, comme plus détaillé ailleurs, le diagnostic de la maladie de Lyme doit se faire avant tout à partir des signes cliniques, la confirmation par les tests de laboratoires étant très difficile à obtenir. Par ailleurs, des co-infections peuvent exister, elles doivent être prises en compte. De plus, il existe actuellement une polémique concernant la durée et la nature de la thérapie, mais il est manifeste que la thérapie doit être individualisée.

La maladie de Lyme chez les enfants peut affecter le système nerveux de de la même façon qu'elle peut le faire chez les adultes, de plus elle est potentiellement plus néfaste sur un cerveau en voie de développement. Les pédiatres et les spécialistes pédiatriques relèvent un défi supplémentaire imposé par le manque de transmission des symptômes du patient au physicien.

On devrait toujours considérer que la maladie de Lyme est traitable et requiert une thérapie agressive afin d'éviter l'affaiblissement neurologique dévastateur éventuellement irrémédiable.

Lectures suggérées :
Belman AL, Coyle PK, Roque C, et al: MRI Findings in Children Infected by Borrelia burgdorferi. Pediatric Neurology 8:428-31.

Belman AL, Iyer M, Coyle PK, et al: Neurologic Manifestations in children with North America Lyme Disease. Neurology 43:2609-2614.

Demaerel P, Wilms G., Casteels K, et al: Childhood neuroborreliosis: clinicoradiological correlation. Paediatric Neuroradiology 37:578-581.

Fallon BA, Nields JA: Lyme Disease: A Neuropsychiatric Illness. Am J Psychiatry 151:1571-1583.

Lawrence C, Lipton RB, Lowry FD and Coyle PK: Seronegative Chronic Relapsing Neuroborreliosis. European Neurology 35: 113-117.

Lesser RL, Kornmehl EW, Pachner AR, et al: Neuro-Opthalmologic Manifestations of Lyme Disease. Ophthalmology 97:699-706.

Pachner AR and Steere AC: The triad of neurologic manifestations of Lyme disease: Meningitis, cranial neuritis, and radiculoneuritis. Neurology 35: 47-53.

Pachner AR: Borrellia burgdorferi in the Nervous System: The New "Great Imitator”. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 539: 56-64.

Reik L, Jr.: Lyme Disease. In Scheld WM, Whitley, Durack DT, eds: Infections of the Nervous System, New York, 1996, Raven Press.

Zaidman GW: The Ocular Manifestations of Lyme Disease. International Ophthalmology Clinics 33: 9-22

EEG : Electroencéphalographie
ADHD : Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder = désordre d'hyperactivité de déficit d'attention
CNS : Central Nervous System = Système nerveux central
PNS : Peripheral Nervous System = Système nerveux périphérique
EMV : Electromyographie
NCV : Nerve Conduction Velocity
(Tests enregistrant la vitesse à laquelle les impulsions voyagent par des nerfs et mesurent des réponses électriques.)


Modifié en dernier par KAT le 25 Mai 2006 23:47, modifié 2 fois.

Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message:
MessagePublié: 25 Mai 2006 23:34 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 23 Juil 2005 14:14
Messages: 669
Localisation: seine et marne
mais on ne t'arrête plus!!! :D :mouak :ensemble

_________________
Nath, Paris
:idea: lexique des abréviations


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message:
MessagePublié: 26 Mai 2006 01:34 
Hors-ligne
Administrateur du site
Administrateur du site
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 18 Juil 2005 20:21
Messages: 540
Localisation: Genève
meme la mise en page cartonne !!
:super :super

_________________
dave / 27 ans / Genève / mon topo

:idea: lexique des abréviations
:idea: comment utiliser ce forum ?


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message:
MessagePublié: 26 Mai 2006 01:39 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif

Enregistré le: 07 Fév 2006 13:55
Messages: 47
Localisation: Midi Pyrénées
... Oui, que veux-tu ?! ... on m'a appris à toujours bien faire les choses... A chacun ses talents ! Certains, comme Nath d'ailleurs :mouak , sont d'excellents découvreurs d'articles... d'autres trouvent le temps d'aider à leur compréhension... :wink:


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message: manifestations neurologiques
MessagePublié: 26 Mai 2006 09:52 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif

Enregistré le: 07 Avr 2006 12:34
Messages: 477
Coucou les jumelles NathKat,

Il vous arrive quelquefois de dormir???????????????

C'est affolant........je ne suis plus une enfant, loin de là...mais je coche encore, depuis la traduction.....Avant cela, je n'avais même pas regardé le sujet!

:merci mille fois!

Si d'aventure......vous trouviez ce genre de parution concernant les problèmes cardiaques, je saurai à quoi m'attendre ...........;bien que je le suppute!


:mouak


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message:
MessagePublié: 18 Juin 2006 13:47 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 20 Jan 2006 21:21
Messages: 1499
Localisation: auvergne
encore chapo, kat.
celui là, je ne l'avais pa vu, je me suis dépêché de le mettre dans ma collection.
J'ai même encore appris des choses sur SNC, alors que je suis fortement concerné par ce sujet :flower


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
 Sujet du message:
MessagePublié: 18 Juin 2006 22:32 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 06 Juin 2006 15:46
Messages: 36
Localisation: l'isle d'abeau
kat
merci pour les renseignements.sans toi on serait perdu!!!! :super


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 10 Jan 2010 22:06 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 21 Nov 2009 19:02
Messages: 309
Localisation: 39
Kat et Nath, merci énormément pour cet article et sa traduction.
Je sais que personne n'est intervenu sur ce sujet depuis longtemps.

Mais grâce à vous je viens de mieux comprendre certains comportements de mon enfant.
J'ai pu lui poser des questions, auxquelles il a répondu, il n'avait lui non plus jamais mis de mots sur ces soucis, de comportement entre autres.

Merci beaucoup et en même temps cela m'attriste car je me rends compte qu'à 7 ans il se trouve déjà dans la version chronique. Qu'est ce que ça fait mal...

Déjà pour moi, même si j'ai et je garde le moral, je me dis , à 31 ans, il me reste un certain nombre d'années devant moi avec vivre avec cette saloperie. Mais lui...

Je sais aussi que nous ne sommes pas les seuls dans cette situation et j'envoie plein de bonnes pensées et de courage à celles et ceux qui sont concernés.

Bon courage?
Titine.

_________________
"Le coeur perçoit ce que l'oeil ne voit pas ".


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 10 Jan 2010 22:25 
Hors-ligne
membre actif
membre actif

Enregistré le: 09 Sep 2008 10:10
Messages: 198
coucou titine,

je te comprends tellement! nous avons le meme age et nos enfants ont un an d'écart.

Je me pose aussi beaucoup de questions, des interrogations restées sans reponses, quand a l'avenir, pour l'instant nous vivons au jour le jour :-)

Cet article est interessant, je me rend compte aussi que Pauline est dans la phase chronique aussi : problemes de concentration, de memoire... mais en meme temps je ne peux pas affirmer non plus que ce soit du à Lyme, meme si j'y crois fortement !


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
MessagePublié: 27 Juin 2013 19:20 
Hors-ligne
Administrateur du site
Administrateur du site
Avatar de l’utilisateur

Enregistré le: 14 Déc 2007 22:03
Messages: 4119
Localisation: près de carcassonne 11
Acute Transverse Myelitis in a Pediatric Case of Lyme Disease = Myélite transverse aigüe chez un cas pédiatrique de Maladie de Lyme

http://adc.bmj.com/content/97/Suppl_2/A239.4.short

_________________
topo


Haut
 Profil  
Répondre en citant  
Afficher les messages publiés depuis:  Trier par  
Publier un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet  [ 11 messages ] 

Les heures sont au format UTC + 2 heures [ Heure d’été ]


Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 1 invité


Vous ne pouvez pas poster de nouveaux sujets
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets
Vous ne pouvez pas modifier vos messages
Vous ne pouvez pas supprimer vos messages
Vous ne pouvez pas joindre des fichiers

Recherche de:
Aller à:  


cron

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Traduit par phpBB-fr.com

 

 

Mentions légales | Media-tiques | France Lyme | Facebook | Twitter | RSS Contact

 

Application iPhone-iPod TouchApplication iPad

 

 

France Lyme France Lyme, Association de Lutte contre les Maladies Vectorielles à Tiques. 5 Cami del Canigonenc 66740 VILLELONGUE DEL MONTS, FRANCE
SIREN : 509 637 500 • SIRET du siège : 509 637 500 00018 • NAF : 94-99 Z

 

Association reconnue d'intérêt général.